THE INFLUENCE OF REGIONAL SPINAL CORD HYPOTHERMIA ON TRANSCRANIAL MYOGENIC MOTOR-EVOKED POTENTIAL MONITORING AND THE EFFICACY OF SPINAL CORD ISCHEMIA DETECTION

THE INFLUENCE OF REGIONAL SPINAL CORD HYPOTHERMIA ON TRANSCRANIAL MYOGENIC MOTOR-EVOKED POTENTIAL MONITORING AND THE EFFICACY OF SPINAL CORD ISCHEMIA DETECTION
S. A. Meylaerts, P. De Haan, C. J. Kalkman, J. Lips, B. A. De Mol and M. J. Jacobs J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg, 1999

Spinal cord ischemia was produced in six pigs by clamping a set of critical lumbar arteries, previously identified by transcranial myogenic motor-evoked potentials and lumbar artery clamping. The time between the onset of ischemia and detection with transcranial myogenic motor-evoked potentials was determined at cerebrospinal fluid temperatures of 37 degrees C and 28 degrees C. The influence of progressive cerebrospinal fluid cooling on transcranial myogenic motor-evoked potential amplitude and latency was determined. The time necessary to produce ischemic transcranial myogenic motor-evoked potentials was no affected at moderate subdural hypothermia.